Wednesday, 17 October 2018

Words On WEDNESDAY

Words this week involve two captions (PICS) of a rail line and a man with head cupped in his hand.sitting on a bench.

Present day Fogsend is a depressing place. Once a thriving village but like so many other places in the nineteen fifties in Britain died of desertion when scores of unprofitable rail branch lines were closed being deemed unprofitable by then 'British rail'. It's desertion transformed it backwards and likened it to the neighbouring village of  Frogsbottom; now sadly derelict and its evil past seeped in history sadly forgotten.

It is a strange fact that most Great Plagues in history have crept up on us without warning. During the 16 -17th Centuries our people woke up to full-blown disasters. Fogsend village two leagues distant from Charlsgrove and Studhampton was where the following meeting took place in the summer of 1669 on a bright Saturday morning. When Sid a swineherd from Fogsend and a varlet by nature,; came upon an elderly bald serf sitting on a  lichen covered log looking rather depressed with his head cupped in his hands. "How now" Quoth the Varlet to the thatchless serf. "Ye same to thee"  I be Bert from the mill. After which as usually happens when two sons of the earth get together for a chat, after about twenty minutes the varlet spoke.

In my my my Village the stuttering varlet Quoth, has chanced a strange happening and that which has created much marvel and Rummy is ye general verdict, in fact, I would warrant it to be rather peculiar, you see old grandfather Jim of the Mill suddenly turned Black yesterday. Black' says the bald thatchless serf well I will be blown by St Robbin the Philanderer if that doth not leave me in wonder as it came to pass yesterday where I live Fat George the swineherder hath turned black too. 'Thou dost not say; say's the varlet; of a verity I do says the Baldy I be an itinerant worker and I listen to many gossips and spread the news.

And it came to pass one week later the 'Black Death was all over the country. and a man who did not look like Al Jolson singing "SONNY BOY" could be scarcely found anywhere.

Much of the contents of this post caused problems with Grammarly

The powers that be from Grammarly have sent a directive to me stating that I should give prior notice of this type of post which incidentally sent Grammarly spinning out of control.

Vest Daily Gaggle.

15 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

A very different take on the prompts.
Thank you.
And goodness how fast the various plagues spread...

only slightly confused said...

Your imagination is amazing.

messymimi said...

What a unique story!

Lee said...

Well done, Vest. You took us along an unexpected track.

Vest said...

EC. You are always so kind to me.

Vest said...

Only slightly confused. Some imagination some real.

Vest said...

LEE. Thank you, I believe I once lived in the era many year past.

Vest said...

General reply. It is true that from the age of Five until I was a ten-year-old I lived in a village of 300 souls; Off the Grid, Back brook, water mill. a front brook, A well plus water pump, no taps, outside dunny.hens pigs goats Rabbits, dogs, cats. Two Schoolmistresses, Five pubs. The White Hart, Six Bells, Red lion, The Crown.and the Lamb. And several Village Idiots.
And I loved It.

Cindi Summerlin said...

oh how I loved this! and the argument with Grammerly!

Vest said...

Messymimi. Thank you for your appreciation, Being rewarded with a favourable return comment helps a lot and inspires me to greater effort:)

Vest said...

Cindy Summerlin. I write as I see the situation and enjoy picking the brains of Village Idiots from the past. Thank you for your generous reply.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

My my my kudos for yet another interesting post.

Grammarly can be a pain in the derriere. Same for spellchecker.

Vest said...

Susan Flett Swiderski. I love dragging up the past and its peculiar nonsensical happenings And I am certain that more will be revealed in the near future. :) Thank you for your flattery.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Vest - love the interaction with the two lads from the village centuries ago - while bringing in today's world ... those old descriptive names do live on. Great fun to read - and I hope you'll do more stories like this one - cheers Hilary

Vest said...

Hilary Melton-Butcher. Thank you for your favourable appraisal of my contribution to words on Wednesday. I am about to post an explanation describing the historical details relating to these Ribald stories. I hope to find the words for next Wednesday will slot in somehow within my next yarn.

GONE GONE GONE

Ninety minutes work Simply disappeared from my blog prior to posting. gone forever.  I am totaly*^!@^_^*# off. vest