Friday, 8 April 2011

Egypts political hype could be copied here.

Egypt, is a poor nation with a large population both rooted in rural and religious ways. Illiteracy rates exceed 40 percent.

We saw the implications of this in March, after the military junta rushed to hold a referendum on constitutional amendments, seemingly reformist, but opposed by the secularist democrats. The military and the Muslim Brotherhood backed the amendments.

The Brotherhood's slogan that voters would be obeying Allah if they voted yes, worked effectively. The amendments passed by an astounding 77 percent of the vote out of 18 million cast. (Interestingly, the military government didn't even bother to publish what exactly the amendments said before election day.

Will a non secular driven political party, for example, the Papal hailing leader and wearer of Budgie smugglers; invoke the fear of retribution in followers and take up the cry to summon the faithful to obey God or Allah at the polls here in Australia or the West?

The Muslim Brotherhood has a following of loose brained bloggers around the globe under the guise of World United bloggers, In my opinion; a bunch of latent terrorists.


What a beautiful day it is for freedom! So far, the Egyptian people have given us a wonderful illustration of a how a peaceful revolution can be undertaken. This revolution is remarkable for several reasons; foremost is the fact it was a nonviolent revolution.



Vest ....Back soon.

4 comments:

Jimmy said...

Muslims and Christians in India
vote as directed by the Mullah
and the Bishop respectively

Jimmy said...

10 things to learn from Japan


1. THE CALM
Not a single visual of wild grief. Sorrow itself has been elevated.

2. THE DIGNITY
Disciplined queues for water and groceries. Not a rough word or a crude gesture.

3. THE ABILITY
The incredible architects, for instance. Buildings swayed but didn’t fall.

4. THE GRACE
People bought only what they needed for the present, so everybody could get something.

5. THE ORDER
No looting in shops. No honking and no overtaking on the roads. Just understanding.

6. THE SACRIFICE
Fifty workers stayed back to pump sea water in the N-reactors. How will they ever be repaid?

7. THE TENDERNESS
Restaurants cut prices. An unguarded ATM is left alone. The strong cared for the weak.

8. THE TRAINING
The old and the children, everyone knew exactly what to do. And they did just that.

9. THE MEDIA
They showed magnificent restraint in the bulletins. No silly reporters. Only calm reportage.

10. THE CONSCIENCE
When the power went off in a store, people put things back on the shelves and left quietly.

















--
Best Wishes

Arthur Retnakaran

Jimmy said...

Hazare is championing a citizen-developed bill called “Jan” Lokpal that
will create an independent body, selected by judges, citizens and
constitutional authorities, with enough power to investigate and punish
all politicians. No minister or bureaucrat will be able to influence its
investigations.

Since 1968, when this bill was first introduced, greedy politicians have
thwarted its passing. Now the government is pushing for a watered down
Lokpal with no hope of ending fraud, vice and dishonesty -- it gives
politicians overriding power to decide who will be investigated, and is a
complete eyewash.

Pressure is mounting on Prime Minister Singh to endorse the "Jan" Lokpal.
Members of the opposition party have begun to make the right noises in
support of Anna Hazare. And even the National Advisory Council, a powerful
advisory body to Sonia Gandhi have come out in favour of the bill. But
corrupt politicians and vested interests are doing all they can to kill
it.

Anna Hazare has set the example. But only a national citizens movement can
ramp up the pressure to get Singh to endorse “Jan” Lokpal and save
Hazare's life. Sign the petition and forward it to everyone now:

Vest said...

Jimmy: Voting under duress is illegal anywhere if voting unseen in a ballot box.

Jimmy: More is the pity that Japan and its people were not as Pius and shrinking back in 1942.
Maybe today is Japan's belated comeuppance.