Wednesday, 8 September 2010

Hidden Dementia. Stop its advance, choice of mental activity? plenty of them.

Communicating regularly with a partner a friend or relative in an active manner  such as playing board games requiring the thought processes  such as Draughts (checkers) Chess, UNO, Scrabble and crosswords are but a few of the activities available for persons old and young with time on their hands, even reading the news papers help you stay on track with what is really or supposedly happening around you and the rest of the world.
Older people have their memories and love to converse with the younger set, some of it may be a trifle muddled then again what historical events aren't a a bit askew. History unfolds the main mistakes made by our forbears and that considered taboo in this mod world, although our politicians worldwide continue to  make the same mistakes of the past.
It is pitiful to see elderly persons staring out in space while sitting in the old rocking chair or the like, unable to recognize the beautiful flowers in the garden which they planted a couple of years back. Most cases like this could have been so different if earlier they had chosen the options to stimulate their brain cells by becoming  more active and useful in their surroundings earlier in their lives.
In our  own personal lives my 76 year and betrothed  57 years and I;  having recently celebrated my Fourth 21st birthday, share all the chores of the household. Every thing except fixing difficult computer problems, that is left to our eldest son Chris (Mr clever dick)Although most of the gardening is my world in which  a bountiful supply of flowers and veggies (Thrive) watch out for the advert to appear soon, wouldn't surprise me.
Doing Crossword puzzles and other mentally stimulating pursuits may hide rather than prevent the progress of OLD TIMERS aka  Alzheimer's disease. Evidence suggests that keeping the brain active, by reading, listening to the radio or doing puzzles can delay the onset of dementia.
But the reality could be that, even without symptoms, our brains are suffering progressive damage  behind the scenes, the big problem is when the symptom of old timers do appear the disease  may be further advanced than expected.
Vest Daily Gaggle.   Comment at vest@dailygaggle.com    Post # 695.

The Daily Gaggle. is Seventy lunar months of age.(Looney Months)


I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who have contributed with your comments. Ours is the age of substitutes; instead of language, we have jargon; instead of principles, slogans and perversions; and,instead of genuine ideas, Bright ideas. However your input is always welcome, and may I politely ask that you keep the smut to the minimum. Vest.

24 comments:

Rosemary said...

Over the past 200 games of UNO We have played doubles, Hubby Vest is winning 9 games to 2 on average and the old so and so is eight years older than myself, mr clever dick alright.

Jimmy said...

I was reading about Alzheimers and Parkinsons

my ex wife has the latter and she is only 56

Yes, we must keep active
physically mentally emotionally

yes laff and cry

Jimmy said...

Revision of 60s songs...

They just don't make the songs like they used to any more!!!!!!!

Some of the artists of the 60's are revising their hits with new lyrics to accommodate aging baby boomers who can remember doing the "Limbo" as if it were yesterday. They include:

Bob by Darin - Splish, Splash, I Was Havin' A Flash


Herman's Hermits - Mrs. Brown, You've Got A Lovely Walker


Ringo Starr - I Get By With A Little Help From Depends


The Bee Gees - How Can You Mend A Broken Hip


Roberta Flack - The First Time Ever I Forgot Your Face


Johnny Nash - I Can't See Clearly Now.

Jimmy said...

Paul Simon - Fifty Ways To Lose Your Liver

The Commodores - Once, Twice, Three Times To The Bathroom

Procol Harem - A Whiter Shade Of Hair

Leo Sayer - You Make Me Feel Like Napping

The Temptations - Papa's Got A Kidney Stone

Abba - Denture Queen
"You haven't seen my teeth have you Wilma?


Tony Orlando - Knock 3 Times On The Ceiling If You Hear Me Fall


Helen Reddy - I Am Woman, Hear Me Snore

Leslie Gore---It's My Procedure, And I'll Cry If I Want To
And Last but NOT least...


Willie Nelson ---On the Commode Again

Jimmy said...

Observations on Growing Older
Your kids are becoming you...and you don't like them ...but your grandchildren are perfect!
Going out is good. Coming home is better!

When people say you look "Great"... they add "for your age!"

Jimmy said...

You forget names ... but it's OK because other people forgot they even knew you!!!

The 5 pounds you wanted to lose is now 15 and you have a better chance of losing your keys than the 15 pounds.

Jimmy said...

Aged to Perfection
By Elaine Viets

"These are the best years of your life."

That’s what adults told me when I was in high school.

Boy, was that depressing. I was a tall, scrawny nerd who spent my free time tormenting the less fortunate with my good works.

Bonnie the mean girl beat me up on the way home from school for using words she didn’t understand. And my socks slid down into my shoes. If this was the best, there was no point in living.

But the nuns scared me into going on. Sister said suicide was a sin and hell was infinitely worse than being sixteen.

Now I know the adults were dead wrong.

The teenage years were a time of constant worry: What if I didn’t get a date to homecoming? What if I didn’t get into college? What if I had kids like my bratty brothers?

What if I got married and was so bored I wound up like Mrs. Halifax? She greeted the mail carrier in her black swimsuit – in January.

I don’t know any adults who would say their teenage years were the happiest. But which decade is the best? If we could do it all over again, which years would we revisit?

Jimmy said...

The twenties.
I’d like to look twenty, but I wouldn’t want to be twenty. We’re still overgrown teenagers. We have more money, more sex, and more opportunities to go wrong – but not much more sense than at 16. These are the years we try to work in our chosen profession. We get married or get serious about someone.

We make mistakes that we’ll live with for years.

I married at twenty-one – one of the few smart things I did during that decade. But I worked at a newspaper, which was a lot like joining the buggy whip industry in 1929.

My mother warned me about wearing mini-skirts to the office.

"It’s okay," I told her. "The office is full of old men and they’re all married."

The "old men" were forty. Most of them were married, but that was no bar to an affair.

On second thought, maybe I don’t want to look twenty.

Jimmy said...

The thirties. A delicious decade, particularly after 35. That’s when my family quit trying to make me "normal." I also stopped worrying what other people thought. I understood there were some folks I’d never please. That was their problem, not mine.

This decade had some down sides. I dabbled disastrously in office politics. I could no longer eat like a linebacker. I had to get a gym membership and start dieting.

The forties. Turning forty didn’t bother me. Forty-one did. The morning of my forty-first birthday I felt the great weight of my age. I couldn’t get out of bed.

"I’m old," I told Don. "I’m going to die."

"Not yet," he said, cheerfully. "Get your rear out of bed and go to work."

I got over being forty-one and learned to love this decade. I came to value my friends. And I would need every one. I got fired at age 45. My friends said this was a blessing. After months of moping, I realized they were right. I started writing mysteries, a wonderful adventure. If I was fired now, like most of my media peers, I’d have to start a new career at the worst possible time.

Jimmy said...

The fifties. This decade started out fun, then took a three-year detour for bad health. That’s when I encountered the real danger of these years: The organ recital. That’s what my grandfather used to call an afternoon with the women relatives who relished discussing their ailments. They described "female trouble" in loving detail.

They loved talking about operations and rare diseases.

Wish I had a dollar for every time I heard: "She had a tumor the size of a grapefruit." Why that size citrus? Weren’t there any lemon or orange-sized tumors?

Here’s another organ recital favorite: "The doctors cut him open, took a look and sewed him back up. He was dead in two weeks." Or three months. Or six. These women delighted in death sentences.

In my funky fifties, it’s easy to fall into enthusiastic medical discussions. I have to constantly guard against my own organ recital. So do my friends. Recently, we were talking about a friend’s trip to Costa Rica, then a new restaurant, and next a novel we’d read. Suddenly, we were discussing our operations.

Beverly halted the conversation. "Listen to us," she said. "We’re talking about our ailments like my granny. Let’s discuss something interesting."

"How about sex?" I said.

Silence.

Jimmy said...

"So, Beverly," I said. "How’s your knee operation?"

Posted by Book Tarts at 12:00:00 AM in Elaine Viets

Jimmy said...

Heyyyy Vest
when do men get menopause?

and what pauses then?

Rosemary said...

Finished playing UNO Doubles Ten minutes ago two games of up to 500.
Ist game hubby vest won eight hands by 518 to nil.
2nd game he won in 15 hands Rose was 553 and vest 45, hows that for a demented old geezer.

Jimmy said...

when u dont use it
u loose it

this applies to brain power
muscle power

singing voice
dancing feet

and an erection

Jimmy said...

Soon, 22 September, Maria will begin 82 years of her life. According to the rule: "Life Begins at 80 ... on the Internet" she is still very young.

Wkrótce 22 września Maria zacznie 82 rok życia, czyli w myśl reguły: "Życie zaczyna się po 80-siątce... w Internecie" jest jeszcze bardzo młoda.

Do visit MARIA in POLAND

Jimmy said...

http://maria-pogaduszki.blogspot.com/

Jimmy said...

I want u to do dis VEST

...

Jimmy said...

To dream the impossible dream
To fight the unbeatable foe
To bear with unbearable sorrow
To run where the brave dare not go
To right the unrightable wrong

To love pure and chaste from afar
To try when your arms are too weary
To reach the unreachable star

This is my quest
To follow that star
No matter how hopeless
No matter how far

To fight for the right
Without question or pause
To be willing to march into Hell
For a heavenly cause

And I know if I'll only be true
To this glorious quest
That my heart will lie peaceful and calm
When I'm laid to my rest

And the world will be better for this
That one man, scorned and covered with scars
Still strove with his last ounce of courage

Jimmy said...

To reach the unreachable star .....
and he was my pal VEST

Jimmy said...

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 05, 2007

WILL
I hereby make my last will and testament

Do not attempt to keep me alive by means such as organ transplants and costly medical treatments such as dialysis

Do not spend on funeral expenses, I have donated by body to medical science

I have resigned from the Catholic church
but Jesus is still my saviour

whatever assets i may have at the time of death will be bequeathed as mentioned in my legal will which will be executed by my son

Do not make my dying day a day of mourning
i have lived the good life and I will die happy

I want u guys to sing for me
'I did it my way' by Frank Sinatra
POSTED BY JIM AT 10:40 PM
23 COMMENTS:

Jimmy said...

TIME CHECK

1 43 PM in Mumbai
6 PM in Australaya?

Vest said...

Jimmy: 2pm in Bombay (Mumbai)= 6pm Sydney.

Could be as you suggest at the Wankhede stadium at Mumbai, like an all to COCK clock.

Jimmy said...

an all to COCK clock. ???

Jimmy said...

I am bored stiff
ever since I stopped booze, my pals dont come over or invite me to their parties

How wud it be for u Vest if u stopped visiting the local pub?